Travis Boring of Nidec Speaks to Lexington Rotary

Travis Boring, with Nidec, was the guest speaker at the May 25, 2021 Lexington Rotary Club meeting.
Photo by: W. Clay Crook / The Lexington Progress

Article by W. Clay Crook-

The special guest speaker for the May 25, 2021 Lexington Rotary Club was Travis Boring from Nidec. Nidec transitioned from Leroy Somer in 2016 and Travis has been at the Lexington facility for about ten years. He was originally from north central Pennsylvania, and came by way of Indiana, Michigan, and South Fulton, Tennessee. He came to Lexington in 1996 when his children were still small, working in various places around the area before joining Nidec. His background is in mechanical engineering.

Travis talked about the products at Nidec, and showed a small model of a generator. He spoke about the history of generating electricity and how it changed the world. One modern wind turbine, he said, can produce about 3 megawatts of the 28 trillion megawatts around the world, and that generators from Nidec average 4 megawatts.

Nidec generators are supplied to hospitals, data centers, and any other facility that would benefit from a backup source of electricity, as well as serving as primary sources for facilities in areas that do not have electricity. The sister plant in Minnesota can produce generators that will furnish 25 megawatts of electricity, large enough to supply a small village.

The Lexington facility was built around 1965 by Century Electric, and in the mid 1970’s Century Electric and Gould combined. It was later purchased by Magnetek and had well over 1,000 employees. It later entered business with Emerson Power Systems. In a buyout later, the product line was split, and operated from 1999 as a part of Emerson Electric, with a later acquisition by Leroy Somer, a French based corporation, before becoming part of the Nidec family of industry based in Japan. The purchase by Nidec kept the facility from closing and put it in a position to grow.

The Nidec founder, Mr. Nagamori, pursued a dream of building motors, starting in a small shed, and expanding with the American market with a miniature generator in 1973, and then rapidly expanded in the…

For complete coverage, see the May 26th edition of The Lexington Progress.

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